Once Upon a Time in America

Once Upon a Time in America

  • R
  • 1984
  • 229 min
  • USA, Italy
  • crime, drama
10/10

Noodles, a former gangster during the Prohibition Era, returns to New York after a self-imposed exile to confront his past and make amends for his mistakes.

Director: Sergio Leone

Screenwriters: Piero De Bernardi, Enrico Medioli, Franco Arcalli

Stars: Robert De Niro, James Woods, Elizabeth McGovern

Sergio Leone's epic crime drama is visually stunning, stylistically bold, and emotionally haunting, and filled with great performances from the likes of Robert De Niro and James Woods.

Director


  • Sergio Leone
    Sergio Leone

    Sergio Leone (January 3, 1929 - April 30, 1989) was an Italian film director, producer and screenwriter most associated with the "Spaghetti Western" genre. Leone's film-making style includes juxtaposing extreme close-up shots with lengthy long shots. His movies include The Colossus of Rhodes, the Dollars Trilogy (

Main Cast


Content


Source: based on the novel by Harry Gray

Tagline: As boys, they said they would die for each other. As men, they did.

Genres: crime, drama

Certificate: R

Categories: jewish mafia, gangster, prohibition, mob violence, crime epic, 1920s, childhood friend, juvenile delinquent, date rape, nonlinear timeline, childhood love, speakeasy, police corruption, nostalgia, rival gang, actress, voyeurism, missing money, labor leader, garbage truck, opium, blackmail, jewel robbery, betrayal, brooklyn bridge

Details


Year: 1984

Runtime: 229 min

Country: USA, Italy

Language: English, Italian, French, Hebrew, Yiddish

Color: Color

Aspect Ratio: 1.85 : 1

Sound Mix: Mono

Also Known As


  • Il était une fois en Amérique (FR)
  • Érase una vez en América (ES)
  • Es war einmal in Amerika (DE)

Reviews


  • David Fear (Time Out)

    Sergio Leone's languid, lovely and lengthy ode to Lower East Side mobsters (more specifically, mobster films) ...

  • Adrian Turner (Radio Times)

    Just gasp at the scale, at the immaculate period reconstruction and at that incredible opening with its endlessly ringing phone.

  • Dave Kehr (Chicago Reader)

    Every gesture is immediate, and every gesture seems eternal.